Buffalo Jill


Portrait of William F. Cody known as ‘Buffalo Bill’ (1911)

William Frederick Cody (1846-1917) was an international icon and front-figure for the conquest of the West. Cody started working at 11 after his father died, and by age 14 he was engaged by the Pony Express which marked his debut as a rider and horseman. As a young adult he joined the Union army (1863–1865) during the American Civil War and later became a scout to the US Army in the long lasting American Indian Wars. Cody retired as a US Army Chief of Scouts in 1872 and was awarded the Medal of Honour for gallantry the same year.

Before William Cody quit the Army 26 years old, he had already made the news some years earlier with a series of articles and a novel, even making the front page of the Chicago Tribune. The novel was entitled ‘Buffalo Bill, King of the Bordermen‘ and gave Cody his famous nick-name that originated from Cody’s feat of killing 11 out of 12 buffalos while hunting to feed starving Pony Express* railroad workers.

Cody started his long career as showman with the ‘Buffalo Bill Combination‘ in 1874 and later established the touring ‘Buffalo Bill’s Wild West‘ show in 1883. Cody would continue to spend long periods hunting and scouting, before he began more extensive touring as his ‘Wild West’ met considerable success, performing both in the United States and Europe until 1913. Buffalo Bill was considered worldwide as one of the best known people of his time.

When we analyse William Cody’s career, it is hard not to notice his main occupation was as an actor in his Wild West show during forty years (1873-1913), while his legend as a scout and huntsman lasted less than 9 years. Even in his own time many questioned Buffalo Bill’s real merits and skills.

Seen in todays perspective, it would seem that a large part of William Cody’s life was construed for his later role as a poster-figure for the conquest of the West, and the unification of the American Nation as it was in need of heroes and myth to help create an identity strong enough to hold the American dream together.


Buffalo Bill (1892) with his rifle Springfield Model 1866
•distinctive ‘Mona Lisa’ look in the picture displaying soft thrown out wide hips, narrow shoulders, short arms and fake beard and moustache


William F Cody (1885) in cowboy hat and embroidered, fringed vest
•no jawline, small ears, no brow and very soft grown eyebrows, shallow eyes, soft skin, and artificial theatrical beard and moustache

Cody’s larger than life character hence appears to be a role played in the interest of a young nation in need of glory and noble values. Buffalo Bill seems skillfully crafted and the role played by the lifetime actor and master mason* William Frederick Cody. To best portray his ‘Wild West’ persona there is no doubt Bill could ride and shoot but his skills and attire must be considered part of a script and not the result of a genuine life on the prairie.

As any Wild West performance artist, we must assume much attention was given to his appearence and that his embroidered coats, hats and belts were as well sought out as his hairstyle – and fake beard. If Buffalo Bill was no authentic scout, but rather a trained actor, we must remember how prevalent EGI has proven to be in Hollywood and film from the inception. A capable female actress could very well have played the part of Bill, and the proof might be in the beard – and if you look closely, you might equally see the hidden features* of an EGI lifetime actor.

Ina Talk Shows – 02:35 (in french)
1910 : Buffalo Bill – Archive INA


*Cody was a 32nd degree mason in the Scottish Rite of Freemasonry
*article on ‘Bearded men’ (here) and EGI forum posts on beard (here)

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UNreal

UNreal

North, East, West, South – our media encode, script and popularize stories that aim to control the general population. Information is not free or harmless – rather a controlled and refined weapon covertly used on our minds ever since its inception – and model – the Babel.

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